UK students grabbed the headlines earlier in the month as the NUS march got totally out of control, resulting in the vandalism of the Tory headquarters. Young Academic bring you news of continued violence, again in London as students have smashed up a police van in central London. Once again thousands gather in the capital in a demonstration against student fees.

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Protesters surrounded the van in Whitehall, rocking it back and forth and smashing the windscreen with wooden poles.

Other students tried to stop them vandalising the vehicle.

Police say there will not be a repeat of the violence of a fortnight ago, when there were 60 arrests and dozens of people required hospital treatment.

Earlier, Edward Woollard, 18, pleaded guilty to violent disorder after admitting throwing a fire extinguisher from the roof of Millbank Tower during those protests.

Students are holding rallies across the country today in cities including London, Birmingham, Glasgow, Manchester and Cambridge.

Two men were arrested on Tuesday on suspicion of violent disorder, one in Leicester and another in London.

Police will be keen to show they are well prepared after claims they were caught out by the high turnout on in Westminster on November 10.

Former Met Police commissioner Brian Paddick told Sky News police would “throw the kitchen sink” at the demo to ensure there is no violence.

“There will be many officers there this time round,” he said.

The Liberal Democrats’ headquarters could also be among the targets because many of the party’s MPs – including the Deputy Prime Minister – have indicated they will vote for higher fees despite previously pledging not to.

In a speech on Tuesday evening Mr Clegg called on students to reconsider their opposition to the Government’s plans.

“I know that more protests are planned by students tomorrow. I make just one request of those planning to protest: examine our proposals before taking to the streets,” he said.

“Listen and look before you march and shout. Our plans will mean that many of the lowest income graduates will repay less than they do under the current system.”

NUS president Aaron Porter says he wants students to protest in order to hold the Government to account but insisted: “There are no conditions in which violence is acceptable.”

He told Sky News: “We saw a couple of weeks ago the anger that students had with regard to the Government’s proposals and tomorrow is another opportunity for students to show what they think about those proposals.

“From my perspective I think it’s really important that the campaign continues its momentum and we continue to hold the Government to account.”

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About Author

Charles Whitworth is the Editor of the Young Academic publications. Graduating from the University of Liverpool with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism in 2008, Charles learnt his trade in newsrooms such as IPC Media and Sky. He has now developed as a top sports, music and current affairs journalist and has been printed in a range of publications including The Guardian. His interests include Cricket, Football, Rugby, Music and Current Affairs. Fresh from the editorship of Student Times he now takes the reins at Young Academic - the premier student news portal. Connect with me on Google+

8 Comments

  1. Considering this the ‘premier student news service’, I’m surprised about the biased tone and balance of this piece. Think the author’s been reading too many met police press releases and not actually seen or been involved in what actually happened.

    Students (including school children and college students) are angry at the Coalition’s plans to increase tuition fees to unaffordable levels and get rid of the Education Maintenance Allowance which keeps young people in education when they would otherwise be dumped into unemployment. We should be supporting the fact that young people are taking a stand on this important issue and not sensationalising the tiny minority who cause trouble.

    • There is no bias in this piece, just facts. It does not condemn or condone the events – simply outlines them. This kind of reaction is pleasing though – free and healthy debate on this site is what we’re looking for 🙂

      The student protests have been pleasantly refreshing – showing that this country is still capable of some sort of revolution! Some of the violence is unacceptable however – please continue to send in your thoughts.

      All the best guys 😉

      • Just the facts that you want to present. You don’t put across the students who took part’s point of view. Aaron Porter and the NUS were nothing to do with this protest.

        You fail to mention some of the brutal tactics actually used by the police including containing children as young as 14 in the cold for hours on end and charging peaceful protesters with mounted police.

        Not sure why I’m wasting my time. No one reads this…

        • Jgrant22,

          These are a point of view and are not being expressed as fact by Young Academic. They are there for our readers to come to their own conclusions. Feel free to submit your own for publication.

          As the national student news portal, we invite all our readers to submit their articles in order to create an informed debate.

          You are of course entitled to your opinion and would love you to send in more to [email protected] along with images.

          We are on your side!

          All the very best

          • You said in your first response you were presenting just facts: “There is no bias in this piece just facts. It does not condemn or condone the events – simply outlines them.” Now you’re saying: “These are a point of view and are not being expressed as fact by Young Academic.” Seems you’ve caught the Lib Dem u-turn bug…

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