Friday 26th May 2017,

London School of Economics Tops the List of Leading Universities in the Capital

Education news is top of the agenda this afternoon here at Young Academic as The Sunday Times University Guide 2012 is published. The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)  has been named the top university in London according to the survey.

Imperial College also gets top honours for it’s student’s gaining graduate level jobs upon graduation in the 64-page guide, now in its 14th year, which is published this Sunday, September 11 with The Sunday Times. Other highlights include;

  • Imperial College has the most students in London with graduate level jobs
  • Greenwich leads the way in teaching excellence according to students

Top in London

Rank Name

Sunday Times UK rank

2011

Sunday Times UK rank

2010

Teaching excellence

%

Graduate unemployment

%

Graduate level jobs %

1

London School of Economics and Political Science

4

5

74.9

7.4

95.6

2

University College London

7

4

73.5

7.1

87.8

3

Imperial College

14

3

68.4

8.0

95.7

4

King’s College London

17

10

73.1

7.4

88.8

5

Queen Mary

23

28

76.1

9.9

82.4

6

Royal Holloway

35

31

74.8

9.5

70.5

7

Brunel University

39

49

77.8

8.5

68.4

8

School of Oriental and African Studies

43

32

70.4

11.6

66.7

9

City University

45

46

71.8

8.7

84.0

10

Goldsmiths

52

52=

74.6

12.1

52.3

11

University of the Arts London

70

81

70.5

13.7

66.1

12

University of Greenwich

81

85=

78.3

15.4

66.6

13

Kingston University

84

75

69.8

14.5

66.9

14

University of Roehampton

86

92=

72.8

9.9

69.1

15

St Mary’s University College, Twickenham

94

108

78.1

8.5

68.2

16

University of Westminster

97=

72=

66.5

15.9

70.8

17

University of East London

102

106

73

20.2

58.1

18

Middlesex University

107

107

73.5

13.2

62.7

19

London South Bank University

118

120

69.3

16.3

75.3

20

University of West London

120

121

71.8

8.8

55.6

21

London Metropolitan University

122

117

65.3

14.5

50.5

An institution founded in 1895 by, among others, George Bernard Shaw, in little over a century, LSE has become the world-leader in the study of economics, politics and the social sciences. Upon graduation students earn an average salary of £28,594, almost £9,000 above the UK average, and many go on to occupy high positions in governments and civil services the world over. If LSE had decided to charge £9,000 a year for tuition fees, nobody would have batted an eyelid. Displaying the same lateral thinking for which its graduates are renowned, the school has opted to set its fees at £8,500 a year.

The school is in a better position than most to set lower fees thanks to the huge number of overseas students it recruits at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. There will be considerable support for those from poorer backgrounds with at least 37 National Scholarship Programme awards of £3,000 for the first-year, rising to £4,900 in the second and third years and the school will also offer significant bursaries awards ranging from £500 up to £3,500.

The reach of the school’s bursaries will help bring the average level of tuition fees paid down to just over £7,500 — a rate bettered by just 25 universities in England. This — and an extensive outreach programme of mentoring, tutoring, taster sessions and campus visits — should help keep the proportion of working-class students 50% higher than at Oxbridge. Professor Christopher Pissarides won the Nobel Prize for economics last October and is the 16th Nobel laureate from the LSE. Undergraduates enter with straight As at A-level and three-quarters go on to gain either a first or 2:1 in one of the narrow portfolio of degree courses: 35 at present, rising to 36 with the introduction of a BSc in management next year.

Imperial graduates are among the most sought-after in the world, which is probably why 95.7% are in graduate level jobs within six months. They are also among the best paid — earning on average £29,257 in their first job after leaving university. The reason for their success is not hard to fathom. Imperial attracts some of the brightest students. In its specialist fields of science, engineering and medicine it competes directly with Oxbridge, and accordingly, it recruits globally. During the past 14 years, Imperial has never finished outside the top four in The Sunday Times university league table until now.

According to student satisfaction results Greenwich has the best score in the region for teaching excellence. Not surprising when considering that one of the university’s research breakthroughs was recently named by British academics as one of the 10 most important discoveries made by a UK university over the past 60 years. Greenwich’s scientists developed an artificial cow that attracts and kills tsetse flies, which transmit the deadly sleeping sickness. It has led to a dramatic fall in outbreaks of the disease which kills thousands of people in Africa. Greenwich gained university status in 1992 and the curriculum is still focused on vocational courses ranging from traditional programmes such as teacher training to newer occupations such as horticulture and paramedic science.

The Sunday Times University Guide 2012 provides students and their parents with an invaluable first reference point on the path to finding a university place. It contains full profiles of all universities and the leading colleges of higher education. The league table is drawn up from criteria including student satisfaction, teaching and research quality, entrance qualifications held by new students, degree results achieved, student/staff ratios, graduate unemployment levels and university dropout rates.

Young Academic will be publishing a series of campus profiles and career guides just in time for the impending academic year as well as some great additions to the all new school of music. To ensure you don’t miss a thing, make sure you make your way back to Young Academic every day!

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About The Author

Charles Whitworth is the Editor of the Young Academic publications. Graduating from the University of Liverpool with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism in 2008, Charles learnt his trade in newsrooms such as IPC Media and Sky. He has now developed as a top sports, music and current affairs journalist and has been printed in a range of publications including The Guardian. His interests include Cricket, Football, Rugby, Music and Current Affairs. Fresh from the editorship of Student Times he now takes the reins at Young Academic - the premier student news portal. Connect with me on Google+

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