Friday 26th May 2017,

Professor Brian Cox Urges Us to Ask Questions Following Discovery of Kepler 22-b

Following the discovery of a potentially life bearing new planet, Kepler 22-b, Young Academic can bring you the thoughts of celebrity scientist Professor Brian Cox. Following an interview on BBC Radio 5 with Richard Bacon, the former D:ream musician stressed the significance of discovering this new earth-like planet and urges us to keep asking questions about what is out there.

NASA yesterday confirmed the existence of Kepler 22-b, so called due to the revolutionary telescope that discovered it. The device is so powerful that it could be discovering up to 100 new planet every year!

In fact, the Kepler team stated that their telescope had spotted up to 1,094 new ‘candidate’ planets – doubling any previous discoveries.

Kepler 22-b is 600 light years away and has a surface temperature of 22 degrees Celsius – much like Earth, this could be the perfect conditions for the promotion of water and life. Although the existence of either of these is at present, pure speculation. It is also 2.4 times the size of our planet and is already being dubbed as Earth 2.0 by the media.

Astronomers confirmed the existence of Kepler 22-b and are excited by its location in what is known as the “habitable zone” around a star that has stark similarities to our Sun. It is for this reason that Kepler 22-b is capturing the imagination of those interested an astronomy or the prospect of life away from our planet.

The planet, Kepler 22-b, lies about 600 light-years away and has a temperature of about 22 degrees Celsius.

Whether Kepler 22-b is made of rock, gas or liquid is as yet unknown, but the intriguing developments of the last twenty four hours could well spark further investigation by the best astronomers and scientists known to man.

Watch this space for further updates from your favourite student portal!

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About The Author

Charles Whitworth is the Editor of the Young Academic publications. Graduating from the University of Liverpool with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism in 2008, Charles learnt his trade in newsrooms such as IPC Media and Sky. He has now developed as a top sports, music and current affairs journalist and has been printed in a range of publications including The Guardian. His interests include Cricket, Football, Rugby, Music and Current Affairs. Fresh from the editorship of Student Times he now takes the reins at Young Academic - the premier student news portal. Connect with me on Google+

7 Comments

  1. Eric Mack December 7, 2011 at 1:39 pm

    Why does it have to be similar to Earth to be able to support life?   Life could exist in any environment, maybe a 200 degree planet generated life able to live in that environment.  Are we that vain in saying it has to be the same?

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